Allen West “Our enemies are watching us slowly dismantle Military capability. The wolves are salivating”

Iraq War Name

Realignment of military budget must have enemies cheering

Written by Allen West on November 19, 2013

According to the New York Times, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel is pondering “realignment” of the military budget, which means a shift in strategic posture. That’s the sort of news which should cause grave concern about our military readiness – unless, of course, you’re one of our enemies.

According to Secretary Hagel, “The Army was the principal institution fighting those two wars (Iraq and Afghanistan), as the armies normally are in land wars,” Mr. Hagel said. “So as those requirements have come down, there’s going to be an adjustment.” That view is driving a new look at the Pentagon’s traditional, even distribution of funds. Hagel further states, “I don’t think you can just make easy, simple assertions based on simple formulas — a third, a third, a third,” he said. “That might turn out to be just about right, but it may not.”

DON’T STOP READING, THERE IS MORE HERE:

http://allenbwest.com/2013/11/realignment-military-budget-must-enemies-cheering/#DjUOH0qmYR6fshqW.99

Next Generation’s Allen West speaks with Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin about the Obama administration’s security team

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Col. Allen B. West speaks with Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin (RET) about the Obama administration’s security team. Are Secretary of Defense Nominee Chuck Hagel, Secretary of State John Kerry and CIA Head nominee John Brennan the best choices to lead in these trying times? Are they equipped to deal with threats like the Muslim Brotherhood? And how will the sequester affect the readiness and preparedness of our military? Find out.

AW18

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE DISCUSSION: NEXT GENERATION TV via PJTV

America’s New Security Team: Is It Ready for Prime Time?

Allen West “President Obama, as Commander-in-Chief, should be focused on sequestration and the failure of his policies in the Middle East”

AWforNGTV

by Allen West

On Sec Def Leon Panetta’s statement re: opening up direct combat billets to women. First of all, women in combat zones are serving in combat and the new 21st century battlefield means anyone outside of their FOB( Forward Operating Base) will potentially be engaged in a combat situation.

However, to make the insidious policy decision that we shall now open up combat billets to women is something completely different. GI Jane was a movie and should not be the basis for a policy shift. I know Martha McSally, have known women who are Apache and Cobra helicopter pilots, and served with women who were MPs, but being on the ground and having to go mano y mano in close combat is a completely different environment.

I completely disagree with this decision and can just imagine all the third and fourth order effects and considerations for implementation, such as standards for training. Unless the Obama administration has not noticed we are fighting against a brutal enemy and now is not the time to play a social experiment with our ground combat forces. President Obama, as Commander-in-Chief, should be focused on sequestration and the failure of his policies in the Middle East. This is the misconceived liberal progressive vision of fairness and equality which could potentially lead to the demise of our military.

Rep. Allen West Introduces National Security and Jobs Protection Act

With sequestration looming, bill encourages bipartisan cooperation

(WASHINGTON) — Congressman Allen West (R-FL) released this statement after introducing the National Security and Jobs Protection Act, to be debated in the House of Representatives Thursday:

“In just over 100 days, automatic across-the-board cuts will take effect, substantially reducing funding for national defense and essential domestic programs by as much as 10 percent. These cuts will undercut key responsibilities of the Federal Government and will take our military to the smallest size since World War II.

President Barack Obama’s own Secretary of Defense has referred to the pending sequestration as ‘not good policy’ and says ‘cuts of this magnitude done in an across-the-board fashion would be devastating to defense and nondefense programs.’

On May 10, 2012, United States House of Representatives Republicans passed a proposal to responsibly deal with this looming threat, the Sequester Replacement Reconciliation Act of 2012, H.R. 5652.  However, if the President opposes, and the United States Senate continues not to act, Republicans are prepared to work with the President on alternatives to achieve the same goal of replacing the sequester with cuts to lower priority spending programs, while protecting members of the armed services, our national security, important domestic programs and our fragile economy.

The National Security and Jobs Protection Act that I have introduced, to be acted on this week, requires the President of the United States to submit an alternative plan to replace the sequester, and encourages the United States Senate to follow suit with its own alternative.

The President said last week that he wants the ‘strongest military the world has ever known.’  House Republicans are willing to work across the party aisle and with the President to create a solution that will support our men and women in uniform.

We don’t have much time left before the automatic cuts in sequestration take effect, and we need to work together to find a solution. The January 2nd deadline is quickly approaching. The National Security and Jobs Protection Act will not only ensure we continue to have a strong Armed Forces, it will show the American people their elected leaders are fully capable of working together to solve the problems facing their nation.”
To review the National Security and Jobs Protection Act, click here.
To review the Sequester Replacement Reconciliation Act of 2012, H.R. click here.

Rep Allen West’s Legislative Low Down & Weekly Wrap Up

Dear Patriot,

Greetings to our constituents, fellow Floridians, and all Americans.  Reflecting on the past week, I will tell you that Saturday morning got off to a very emotional and great start. My youngest daughter, Austen, was sworn-in as a United States Navy Sea Cadet, part of the USS Spruance Division in Fort Lauderdale. Our family was there as she placed her left hand on the American flag and took her oath.  Could this lead to the first Sailor in the lineage of service in the West family? It will make the Army-Navy game quite personal!

In keeping with this military theme, the past week was really about national security in many different ways. I pray there will be a strong, capable United States Navy and United States Military, for my daughter to join in the future. I am deeply concerned that again our Federal Government is forcing our men and women in uniform to pay the bills for the fiscal irresponsibility of Washington D.C.

Let us not forget that 62 percent of our federal spending is mandatory spending; net interest on the debt, MEDICAID, MEDICARE, and Social Security. Our defense budget, base and overseas operations, makes up only 19.6 percent of the total. Even if we eliminate the entire defense budget, America still runs close to a trillion dollar deficit this year.
It will take courageous leaders who will stand up and tell the American people the truth. We must protect and preserve our mandatory spending programs, however they have to be reformed in order to address our deficits and ever increasing debt.

On the heels of the news about harmful cuts to our military — which will take our Army and Marine force strength down to dangerous levels — Secretary of Defense, Leon Panetta, stated we are going to end combat operations in Afghanistan sooner than expected. This is a repeat of the strategy which fails to understand the enemy has a vote. There are only two ways to end a combat operation or war — you win or you lose. You do not stop in the 4th quarter and tell the referee that you are going to leave the field. And as expected, following Secretary of Defense Panetta’s statement about Israel’s contemplation of an attack on Iran, America got a threat from Iran’s Supreme Leader.

We MUST stop telegraphing weakness.

I spoke to the Reserve Officers Association this week and laid out a national security strategy for the 21st Century Battlefield of “Engage, Deter and Strike.” We talked about how we must conduct a global threat assessment in order to develop the requirements and capability to meet any threat for the next 15 years.  I also had the distinct privilege of addressing the Arlington Virginia Squadron of the Marine Corps Aviation Association. I built upon the national security strategy and articulated how we must have individuals who understand the tactical level of war serving on Capitol Hill. It is imperative to ensure we have those individuals who can state why we must move away from a Cold War Era forward-deployed military to a power projection force that focuses on strike operations and not nation-building/occupation-style warfare. We discussed how the Marine Corps Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) model is key to understanding how we tailor our forces going forward. Lastly, the Marines and I discussed how we need to create a national military strategy which drives the weapons systems being developed by the defense industrial base.  We need more attack and troop transport helicopters and close air support platforms.

What was special about this week was the chance to speak with allies as well. I had a fantastic conversation with Brigadier General Shmaya Avieli who is head of the Israeli Defense Export and Cooperation Department. We must work with our allies in new weapon system development in order to reduce our procurement and research and development timelines. When we can have more common operating platforms with our allies, we can reduce our logistical support chains and costs which is another driver of the Department of Defense spending.

Also this week, I had the honor of speaking to 30 Officers and Interagency workers attending the Canadian Defense College National Security program, their version of the United States military War College. Having served alongside the Canadian Army in Kandahar, Afghanistan, I was able to use anecdotal stories of how we must have better coordination of National and Operational security strategies to ensure our success at the tactical level. Interestingly enough, we are coming-up on the anniversary of the establishment of the 1st Special Services Brigade “Devil’s Brigade” which was the joint US-Canadian venture and the precursor to our Special Forces.
The closer for this week of national security and defense-related topics was the deployment ceremony for the US Army Reserve 841st Engineer Battalion. Special hat tip to Miami-Dade College North Campus for hosting the event where I was joined by Florida Governor Rick Scott.

Men and women from our local area, and other states as far away as Georgia and Alabama, are deploying to Afghanistan’s RC-North. They represent all that is best about America and are the true one percent who ensure the other 99 percent live in a land of liberty and freedom. We must guarantee they have proper ROE (Rules of Engagement) to enable them to engage the enemy on the battlefield.

The lesson learned for all of us is that the world is still a very dangerous neighborhood. We cannot pretend to believe that targeting our military will relieve our fiscal woes. We must listen to our allies and find the means by which we can cooperatively grow stronger and confront the growing adversaries who wish to promote their hegemonic dominance.

At each opportunity to speak, I challenge more of our uniformed men and women to “ruck up” in a suit and tie and seek out offices to run in their communities.  Capitol Hill I can attest is in need of true warriors and those who have a conviction and commitment for our Constitutional Republic.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Legislative Update: The House got back to full legislative work this past week:

– CLASS Repeal — Wednesday, the House of Representatives approved H.R. 1173, the Fiscal Responsibility and Retirement Security Act of 2012 by a vote of 267-159, I VOTED YES. Twenty-eight Democrats supported this legislation. The bill would repeal Title VIII of the Democrats’ government takeover of healthcare law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which established the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) Program—a national, voluntary long-term care insurance program for purchasing community living assistance services and supports.

– Pro-Growth Budgeting — Thursday, the House of Representatives approved H.R. 3582, the Pro-Growth Budgeting Act of 2012 by a vote of 242-179, I VOTED YES. Four Democrats supported this legislation. The bill would require the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) to prepare a supplemental estimate of the macroeconomic impact of any major bills reported by a House or Senate committee. Under H.R. 3582, a “major bill” would be defined as legislation with any one-year estimated budgetary effect of more than one-fourth of one percent (0.25%) of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in that year.

– Baseline Reform — Friday, the House approved H.R. 3578, the Baseline Reform Act of 2012 by vote of 235-177, I VOTED YES. Four Democrats supported this legislation. The bill would remove the automatic annual inflation adjustment from CBO’s discretionary baseline spending projections, thereby removing the baseline assumption that discretionary spending will increase each year.

– FAA Authorization (Conference Report) — Friday, the House approved the Conference Report on H.R. 658, the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 by a vote of 248-169, I VOTED YES. Twenty-four Democrats supported this legislation. The Conference Report would reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) operations and programs for four years, from Fiscal Year 2012 through Fiscal Year 2015. The legislation would provide a total authorization of $63.4 billion over the four year period, including $50 billion in discretionary authorizations and $13.4 billion in contract authority through the Airport Improvement Programs (AIP).

Highlights of the Week:

– Tuesday, 31 January, cast my vote and conducted several media interviews on the Florida GOP Presidential primary.

– Wednesday, 1 February, addressed the Reserve Officers Association Conference, met with Kristina Hebert of the Marine Industry Association of South Florida who attended the Small Business Committee full hearing on “The State of American Small Businesses.” Met with Brigadier General Shmaya Avieli, head of the Directorate for Israeli Defense Export and Cooperation.

– Thursday, 2 February, met with representatives from the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Taped an interview with CBS News investigative reporter on the two month payroll tax increase fees on government sponsored enterprises (Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) loan guarantees. Video here. Linked up with Iraq combat buddy SGM(R) George Gurrola and escorted him to House chamber and gave a Capitol tour after evening votes. Addressed the Marine Corps Aviation Association.

– Friday, 3 February, conducted an after action review and gave guidance for next Conservative Black forum. Addressed Officers from the Canadian Forces College National Security program. Met with Cindy Chafian Executive Director of “The Mommy Lobby” who asked me to be on her Board of Advisors which I proudly accepted.

– Saturday, 4 February, addressed the Soldiers and Families of the 841st Engineer Battalion at their deployment ceremony. Attended the wedding party for Mr. Bill and Mrs. Sharon Petraglia Jr. The Petraglia Family are just wonderful and have always been there for me, God bless and long life to this new American family.

– Sunday, 5 February, attended the World War II Chaplain’s Memorial Ceremony in Boynton Beach to commemorate the memory of the Four Chaplains who sacrificed their lives during the sinking of the US troop transport Dorchester on 2 February, 1943.

– Monday, 6 February, flew back to Washington DC, recorded video address for Combat Veterans for Congress. Participated in the HASC panel on Business Challenges within the Defense Industry.

REGISTER TO RECEIVE ALL CONGRESSMAN ALLEN WEST’S E-NEWSLETTERS HERE: west.house.gov

 

Democrats and Republicans in Congress are poised for an ideological battle in 2012 over the future of the U.S. military.

Lawmakers geared up for battle over defense spending, military strategy

By John T. Bennett for The Hill

Democrats and Republicans in Congress are poised for an ideological battle in 2012 over the future of the U.S. military.

For the first time since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, Washington’s military strategy and priorities are in flux. The Iraq conflict has ended, the Afghanistan war is on pace to wrap up in 2014 and the Obama administration is enacting plans to shrink the growth of the Pentagon budget.

“The military certainly is at a crossroads,” Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.), a member of the House Appropriations subcommittee on Defense, told The Hill.

While lawmakers on both sides of the aisle agree that the military has reached a point of transition, the consensus largely ends there. The Obama administration and many congressional Democrats favor a smaller, leaner, cheaper military. But GOP lawmakers and many analysts warn that the world is too unstable for the United States to dial back its military might.

In a series of interviews with The Hill, members of both parties agreed that any changes to the nation’s military strategy, construct and priorities should be based on a revised strategy. But as the fallout from the Obama administration’s announcing of a new defense plan showed, there are sharp differences about what form that strategy will take.

President Obama and Pentagon leaders say their new defense plan will require a “leaner” and “more agile” force, and intend to cast aside parts of the force needed for protracted stability operations.

Senior Pentagon officials said the strategy shift is necessary so the force can fight a major conflict while responding quickly to other conflagrations across the globe. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said the envisioned force’s “greatest strength” is that it would be “more agile, flexible, ready to deploy, innovative and technologically advanced.”

But Rep. Allen West (R-Fla.), an Army veteran and House Armed Services Committee member, said the country is “about to do what we always do after wars end” — mistakenly slash defense funding. 

“We need a steady state defense budget,” West said, adding that budgetary “peaks and valleys” make it tough to maintain a lethal military that is feared by potential foes.

COMPLETE THE REST OF THE ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE: THE HILL

Obama’s Defense Drawdown – Op-Ed by Congressman Allen West

by Congressman Allen West – via Facebook

Mr. President, when will you learn? The military cannot continue to be the billpayer for fiscal irresponsibility. what’s driving 62 % of America’s debt is mandatory spending programs. We don’t need a repeat of task force smith! Read this op-ed for more info:

Wall Street Journal Editorial

Obama’s Defense Drawdown

President Obama yesterday put in a rare appearance at the Pentagon, flanked by the four service chiefs and his Secretary of Defense. Saying that now is the time to cash in a peace dividend, he unveiled plans for a significantly slimmed-down military. This dance was choreographed to convey strength. Everything else about it showed how domestic entitlements are beginning to squeeze the U.S. military.

This self-inflicted attack on defense comes at a strange time. True, the U.S. cut deeply after World War II, Korea, Vietnam and the Cold War—and in each case came to regret it soon enough when new threats emerged. But peace doesn’t characterize our time. Mr. Obama yesterday wielded his familiar line that “the tide of war is receding,” which will please his antiwar base but will come as news to the Marines in Afghanistan or the Navy ships patrolling the tense Strait of Hormuz.

The Pentagon shouldn’t be immune to fiscal scrutiny, yet this Administration has targeted defense from its earliest days and has kept on squeezing. The White House last year settled with Congress on $450 billion in military budget cuts through 2021, on top of the $350 billion in weapons programs killed earlier. Defense spending next year will fall 1% in nominal terms. The Pentagon also faces another $500 billion in possible cuts starting next January under “sequestration,” unless Congress steps in first.

Taken altogether, the budget could shrink by over 30% in the next decade. The Administration projects outlays at 2.7% of GDP in 2021, down from 4.5% last year (which included the cost of Iraq and Afghanistan). That would put U.S. outlays at 1940 levels—a bad year. As recently as 1986, a better year, the U.S. spent 6.2% of GDP on defense with no detrimental economic impact.

What’s different now? The growing entitlement state. The Administration is making a political choice and sparing Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, which are set to hit nearly 11% of GDP by 2020. And that’s before $2.6 trillion for ObamaCare, which will surely cost more.

These entitlements are already crowding out spending on defense and thus reducing America’s global standing, following the tragic path that Europe has taken. The difference is that Europe had the U.S. military in reserve. Who will backstop America?

We’re told that Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, who came into office last summer, says he doesn’t want to go down in history as the man who “hollowed out” America’s military. But the security trade-offs foisted on him by the White House will leave the military a less formidable, ready and dominant force in a still very dangerous world.

Part of the problem is that military personnel costs are exploding on pace to exceed the entire defense budget by 2030, according to Andrew Krepinevich of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. It’s hard to make the political and moral case to reduce benefits for veterans and soldiers, but here’s where Mr. Panetta could show mettle on Capitol Hill, especially by reforming military health care. The bulk of any defense budget is better spent on equipment, training and research.

Specific cuts will be spelled out in detail in the next Pentagon budget. The Navy, Air Force and Marines are flying old planes and waiting on the next generation F-35 Joint Strike Fighter jet, which comes with stealth technology. Previous Pentagon chief Bob Gates justified ending F-22 purchases by pointing to the F-35. But now the F-35 will likely be further trimmed and delayed.

After a decade of war, all the services need to replace worn-down equipment. U.S. nuclear submarines, missiles and bombers purchased during the Reagan buildup are reaching the end of their service lives. They need to be replaced, but they probably won’t be soon.

Mr. Panetta and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, General Martin Dempsey, tried gamely yesterday to dress up these cuts not as a drawdown but as a “strategic shift.” The Pentagon will spend less on the infantry to nation-build—now so unpopular—and will switch instead to defend the Pacific and new threats from cyberwarfare and in space.

But where are the resources to match the ambitions, such as new ships to patrol the Pacific? The planned reduction in troop strength is an “acceptable risk” (in General Dempsey’s words) since this Administration doesn’t plan to fight ground wars or pursue any Afghan-style “stabilization” missions. Too bad Commanders-in-Chief don’t get to choose history’s next surprise.

The real message to the world is that the Administration wants to scale back U.S. leadership. This was part of the rationale behind the White House’s reluctance to take the initiative in the Middle East last year, as well as the attempts to mollify Iran’s mullahs and Russia’s Vladimir Putin. Now the Administration plans to draw down troops and America’s profile in Africa, Latin America and Europe. The Navy can easily match Iran’s threats in the Persian Gulf now, but what about in 10 years?

President Obama ended his remarks yesterday by quoting Dwight Eisenhower on “the need to maintain balance in and among national programs.” The line comes from his 1961 Farewell Address, better known as the “military-industrial complex” speech. Mr. Obama’s new defense posture brings to mind another Eisenhower line, offered two years earlier: “Weakness in arms often invites aggression.”