Congressman Allen West – The Truest of Statesman

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When you are looking to describe a statesman you must first understand that  politician and a statesman are not the same thing.   A statesman, is not a tyrant; he is the free leader of a free people and must posses four critical qualities.

  • Strong Principles
  • A Moral Compass
  • A Vision
  • The ability to build a consensus to achieve that vision

I believe in my own mind that two of the greatest statesman to ever live were Winston Churchill and Abraham Lincoln. Along those ideals and principles I personally believe Congressman Allen West is in every word a true statesman. When I read about the strong principles and moral compass I acquired even more affirmation. Then I felt compelled to describe in greater detail why I firmly believe Allen West’s principles are equal to these two great men. (here are some of the things that I found while researching)

  • A statesman follows his moral compass instead of opinion polls, his ideas are often initially out of step with the public mood. But instead of tailoring to that mood, he speaks to the very best within his countrymen. He understands that while their ideals may be deeply buried, powerful rhetoric can bring them forth and activate them. The strength of his words comes from the fact that he actually believes what he says. And he does not make his countrymen’s hearts soar and burn with empty promises; he keeps his word and does what he says he will do.
  • A statesman has a clear vision of what his country and his people can become. He knows where he wants to take them and what it will take to get there.  A statesman is able to recognize problems ahead and be able to come up with solutions that are good not only for the short-term, but for the long-term as well. The statesman keeps in mind not only the here and now, but the world future generations will inherit.
  • A  true statesman makes his decisions by following his own moral compass. He believes in absolute truths, and his moral compass is rooted in a sense of absolute right and absolute wrong. When something is wrong, he plainly says it is wrong and does everything in his power to fight against it. When something is right, he is willing to overcome any opposition to preserve and spread it. The statesman is ambitious—he must be to obtain a position of power—but there are things he simply will and will not do to get to the top. He is a man of integrity; he speaks the truth. He leads by moral authority and represents all that is best in his countrymen.
  • The statesman builds his platform on a foundation of firm, unchanging, fundamental truths. These are the things he believes at his very core.  Just as in the foundation of a house, storms may wear on the structure, opposition and challenges come about, times change, but the foundation remains. A statesman may change the details of his policies and his methods for achieving those policies, but only as much as those short-term tactics serve the purpose of furthering his principles in the long run.

Congressman Allen West possess these qualities and more, he stands by his beliefs and his love of his country. He wants and desires to keep this nation safeguarded for his children and many generations to come. He stands on principles and commands an audience when he speaks. Those that know him have the highest respect for him, those that do not, despise him for having the fortitude to go against the grain.

Recently when being interviewed by NPR, Congressman West was asked about his plans going forward and while the lame-stream media has issued their spun statements  “West compares himself to Abraham Lincoln” a quick listen to the interview will show that Congressman West simply made a statement that “Hey, Abraham Lincoln only served one term in congress”. He was not comparing himself to anyone but making a statement that a once great president only served one term in congress and went on to bigger and better things. Simply put, West is far from done and America is far from letting him go! – Tanya Grimsley

Congressman Allen West on NPR’s Talk of the Nation – Audio 11/7/11

NPR – Talk of the Nation 

For the first time in history two black candidates, President Barack Obama and Herman Cain, may run against each other for the presidency. As it did three years ago, discussions of race and racism continue to play out around both campaigns.

Here is just a snipet of the transcripts from the radio program. To listen click the above link “NPR Talk of the Nation”

CONAN: Congressman West?

WEST: Yeah. I mean, I’d have to agree with what was just said because getting to what statement Dr. Gillespie made, what really are the interests of the black community now? Once upon a time, you know, someone could have said that it was more so about focus on the inner city, social welfare policies, civil rights, things of that. But, you know, even still, you have to understand that, you know, Senator Everett Dirksen did kind of help the civil rights legislation get the push – get pushed through.

But now I think that when you talk about, you know, those policies, you know, and reflect them to the African-American community, well, I mean, there are economic policies that affect the community. And we want to see small businesses grow. And what are the right type of tax and regulatory policies that will enable small businesses, not just to grow on Main Street, quote, unquote, “white America,” but get back into the inner city.

When you understand, you know, recently, when we had unemployment in the black community at an all-time high, it was like 16.7 percent, between 20 to 25 percent for black adult males and close to 45, 46 percent for black teenagers, then people are starting to really ask the questions based upon objective assessment and the right type of policies that are going to enable us to have that growing black middle-income class and, you know, lower to upper income class. And I think that that is what you’re seeing a change, and that’s why you’re starting to see the black community play all across the political spectrum.

READ THE ENTIRE TRANSCRIPT BY CLICKING HERE: NPR

9/22/11 Audio Available 3pm EST of Allen West on NPR – “CBC Needs Conservatism, Civility”

 

Here is the link to the NPR interview with Michel Martin today. It will be available at 3pm EST

NPR  AUDIO

 

For More information on Congressman Allen West visit his two Websites. AllenWestforCongress.com and West.House.Gov

Follow Congressman Allen West on twitter at @AllenWest

“Like” Congressman Allen West on Facebook: Congressman Allen West

Also on twitter @AllenWestRepub (Allen West Republic) and @AllenWest4Congr (Allen West for Congress)

Congressman Allen West: “I don’t want to fight.” with NPR host Michel Martin

Allen West: “I don’t want to fight.”

Rep. Allen West, R-Plantation, will speak with NPR’s “Tell Me More” host Michel Martin today. He’ll talk about why he reconsidered his membership in the Congressional Black Caucus, controversies over his own past remarks, and whether he thinks Democrats and Republicans will ever find common ground.

West, on whether Democrats and Republicans can come to an agreement on fiscal matters, said this: “I think he’s [President Obama] trying to pick a fight with House Republicans. I don’t want to fight. I want to make sure we do the right things for our country.”

On why he reconsidered his membership in the CBC after Rep. André Carson, D-Ind., suggested that some members of the Tea Party would “love to see us as second-class citizens.hanging on a tree,” West said this:

“I’ve been called Uncle Tom, I’ve been called sell-out, I’ve been called Oreo and many other variations of different racial epithets, but you’re not going to hear me come out and say something incendiary which will bring up images of lynchings. I think that we have to be a lot more mature in what we’re saying. So, I still cannot condone what André Carson said, but I think that it’s important for me to stay within the Black Caucus because you have to, as I said earlier, bring that varying perspective and different outlook and insights from a conservative aspect.”

The interview airs today. The show doesn’t air in South Florida, but it’s available online here later today.

All information and MORE obtained from Miami Herald – click for more information