@AllenWest Weekly Wrap Up | via @Next_GenTV | Sept. 20, 2013


The Irony Of Post-9/11 Security – The more the government adds, the less secure our military is

Last Saturday I was the keynote speaker at the Midwest Republican Leadership Conference in Kansas City, Mo. It was a nice gathering, and the best part was that my young nephew, Capt. Herman Bernard West II, and his family, wife Serena and children Jordan Rose and Ethan Bernard, attended.Bernie, as we affectionately call him, recently changed stations from Germany to Fort Leavenworth, Kan., to join next year’s class of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC). After the event, I headed back to Leavenworth with Bernie and family to reminisce about the days when I attended school there.My first school assignment to Fort Leavenworth was after Operation Desert Shield/Storm when I attended the Combined Arms Services Staff School (CAS3), which is no more. The six-week course prepared qualified captains for advanced staff officer positions. I spent last Saturday night at Hoge Barracks, the former CAS3 captain’s quarters but now the post’s Army Hotel – and much nicer.I returned to Fort Leavenworth in 1996 to attend CGSC and earned my diploma and second master’s degree. The new CGSC facility is impeccable and worthy for training the next generation of American military, and international, officers. My last time at Fort Leavenworth in uniform was for the pre-Battalion Command course that lasted for two-and-a-half weeks.Upon returning last week, I arose on Sunday morning and had a nice six-mile run down memory lane. I saw the Buffalo Soldier Monument and remembered being there for the dedication. I ran past what once was the U.S. Military Disciplinary Barracks. (The prison is now part of the federal penitentiary.)

The biggest change was that Fort Leavenworth was an open Army post in the “old days.” As we entered the post this time, we had to show identification at an entrance with several security lanes. Despite those measures, Bernie and I mused about the lax nature of the security, and we chatted about the Fort Hood, Texas, mass shooting incident in 2009, where Maj. Nidal Hasan entered the post basically because of his vehicle decal and ID card, no further checks.

Little did we know that less than 24 hours later, another shooter would repeat the horror of Fort Hood at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C.

The way it was – and is now

A military installation is supposed to be one of the safest places in the country. I remember being stationed at Fort Hood and how our daughters, Aubrey and Austen, would just ride their bikes with their friends for hours. They often rode over to the post movie theater for a Saturday matinee or to the swimming pool. We never felt nervous about them being out and about.It is incredible how the security situation has changed in this post-9/11 world, but we seemingly have taken only cursory measures for our military installations.Four years ago we were shocked by the news of the carnage wrought upon our last duty posting. Our family knew what it meant to be on “lockdown” and could not fathom that happening at Fort Hood. Thousands of military and civilian personnel operated on the largest U.S. military installation in the world and never thought they would be attacked. (Yes, it was a terrorist attack.)New security protocols seem to be in place now, but as we know, security has to be perfect every time. An attacker just needs to be perfect one time.And so it happened again Monday. Military and civilian personnel at the Navy Yard believed they worked at a place that was the safest among the safe. My own dear friend, retired Marine Lt. Col. Neal Puckett, works there. How was it that a heavily armed individual penetrated the security perimeter and engaged unarmed personnel?

Back after the Fort Hood shooting, Michael Savage asked me on his radio show how soldiers could be defenseless and shot on a military installation. We learned then that an executive order from the early 1990s did something inconceivable – turned our military installations into gun-free kill zones. Under that executive order, only select individuals can be armed on a military installation, military police and civilian contract police.

Unarmed forts are unacceptable policy

It is unconscionable that our uniformed servicemen and civilians are defenseless and unarmed at places called “forts.” If an attacker breaches the perimeter security of a base, he is then in a free-fire area. At both Fort Hood and the Navy Yard, civilian police were the ones who took down the assailant.And consider this, it took 10 minutes and 7 minutes respectively for armed response at those facilities. Just imagine what an armed assailant with multiple weapons and unlimited ammunition could do to unarmed military personnel and Defense Department civilians in that span of time.The breaching of perimeter security on military installations is not just happening here in the continental United States. It also has occurred in a combat zone, namely Afghanistan. The attack at the Navy Yard came one year and one day after an attack at Camp Bastion in Helmand Province.Some 15 Taliban attackers got past Tongan guards, not U.S. military, and attacked the AV-8B Harrier II aircraft of the U.S. Marine VMA-211 squadron. The ensuing four-hour firefight resulted in the deaths of two Marines, squadron commander Lt. Col. Christopher Raible and Sgt. Bradley Atwell. Nine Marines were injured, and six Harrier fighter jets and one C-130 aircraft were destroyed.The attack marked the largest single loss of U.S. fighter aircraft since Vietnam – and to this day no one has explained why Tongans were on the perimeter.

Whether we are bolstering defenses against the likes of Aaron Alexis at the Navy Yard, the Taliban in Afghanistan or Nidal Hasan at Fort Hood, we must ensure for this generation and the next that our military installations are highly secure. Our gaps are being exploited, and in this post-9/11 world, the enemy is watching.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West


@AllenWest Weekly Update | Next Generation TV | 9/13/13


Another Fine Obama Mess
The president’s bumbling Syrian policy keeps getting worse.
I have listened to countless experts, pundits and self-acclaimed strategists give their insights into the current Syrian episode, and some of these folks could not find their way out of an open-end paper bag. Unfortunately, many of them are part of the Obama administration.President Obama addressed the nation on Tuesday evening to make his case for the United States to embark upon military action in Syria. However, Obama ended the speech calling for a “pause,” especially because he had just been outmaneuvered by Russian President Vladimir Putin and lacked congressional votes for an attack.The speech ended up being totally confusing, and if I were his adviser – nah, hell has not frozen over – I would have told him not to give that pointless speech.

The realities of Syrian war

First of all, if America is concerned about the use of chemical weapons, we need to understand their delivery method. Chemical weapons are delivered via surface-to-surface systems, normally artillery shells, or even rocket and missiles. These mobile platforms are easily hidden. In Gaza Strip, Hamas Islamic terrorists have converted garbage trucks into multiple rocket-launcher platforms.You also cannot attack a chemical weapons stockpile without creating a larger and more deadly event because high levels of heat are need to destroy the weapons. In other words, we cannot bomb Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s delivery means or his chemical stockpile.Furthermore, the “rebel” forces in Syria may have used chemical weapons. They simply could convert chemical weapons shells into improvised explosive devices and detonate them in target areas based upon prevailing winds for maximum effect.

So when Obama says he intends to degrade Assad’s ability to use chemical weapons, he cannot do that without “boots on the ground.” The best way to deliver precision-guided munitions against mobile targets is to have someone on the ground “lasing” the target and communicating with the aerial delivery platform.

Standoff weapons such as Tomahawk cruise missiles also are only effective against stationary targets, and you can bet by now that Syria’s mobile systems have been repositioned into areas that would yield high levels of collateral damage.

And let us not forget that Syria has one of the most sophisticated and intricate surface-to-air missile systems in the world thanks to our Russian friends. Any U.S. air campaign would not be a walk in the park. Only the boldness of the Israeli Air Force enabled that country’s airmen to enter Syrian airspace and attack targets.

Also remember that air power does not win a ground engagement, as we learned from the folly of Bill Clinton against the Serbs in the Balkans. I still remember the pictures of Serbian forces giving us their version of the “finger” as they conducted their retrograde operation. Their systems were intact.

There are no good guys

Some people believe that bombing Assad’s airfields and air force would be just punishment for using chemical weapons. Well, do that and you may tip the balance of the civil war to the rebels – and we may not want to do that.They are no different from the rebels we assisted in Libya. The Free Syrian Army, led by Col. Riad al-Asaad, initially defected from the Syrian Army and Assad regime. The problem is that the FSA has been sorely neglected in armament, capability and logistical support. If the United States were to somehow find a precision means to support the FSA, we would have to fight Assad’s forces and the Islamists under command of Brigadier Gen. Salim Idriss and the Supreme Military Council.Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the Muslim Brotherhood (i.e., al Qaeda) support the SMC. The two most prominent of the Islamist forces are the Jubhat-al-Nusra Front and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. These are not organizations we want to tip the balance toward, as we did in Libya.

And no better, Iran and Hezbollah are aligned with Assad. This is really a schism between Sunni and Shiite Islamists. The window of opportunity for our intervention closed some two years ago.

Is the use of chemical weapons against civilians horrific? Yes. But the level of brutality and beheadings that occur in most of the Islamic world are just as horrifying. One can read daily about atrocities being committed from Nigeria to Egypt, to the Gaza Strip, to Iraq and to Pakistan.

We cannot embark upon a venture under the guise of having a responsibility to protect unless we want to be all over the world – and the Obama administration has severely decimated our military capability.

We also cannot talk about Syria without examining the unintended consequences of Obama’s ill-conceived operation in Libya. Motivated by far fewer casualties than in Syria, Obama, without congressional approval, provided air and naval power to Islamists. They later showed their gratitude by attacking our consulate and murdering Ambassador Chris Stevens, information management officer Sean Smith, and former U.S. Navy SEALS Ty Woods and Glenn Doherty.

The Islamic terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, was a true national security interest, yet Obama showed no indignation, save against a crude video that his team said inspired the attack. He ordered no response or military action, and now he wants America to forget Benghazi even as he insists that we must act in Syria.

Obama actually referred to Benghazi and his abandoning of Americans under attack and dying as a “phony scandal.”

We’re playing chess, not checkers

I will not be guilt-tripped into believing we must act in Syria because President Obama went off teleprompter. World War I began based upon miscalculations and a series of uncontrollable events that were set in motion.Syria is not our problem; it is the problem of President Vladimir Putin and Russia. If they want to maintain a warm weather port in the Mediterranean Sea, let Putin decide whether he wants Syria to fall into the hands of Islamists.Putin has shown himself the master strategist and outmaneuvered Obama this week, even writing an op-ed in The New York Times. The Obama spin masters cannot twist this into a favorable position for their confused community organizer.

Strategically, if Obama wanted to have an influence, he would have maintained a residual force in Iraq, but campaign promises override strategic vision. Obama plays foreign policy checkers, not chess. He said his foreign policy involved “pivoting away from the Middle East,” and he has abdicated American influence in the region, to the detriment of Israel, by doing just that.

The real fight in the Middle East for America is against the Muslim Brotherhood and their spawn, and against Iran. They must be defeated.

You want to do something related to Syria? Provide logistical support to Jordan and the Syrian refugee camps. Start supporting the Egyptian Army in crushing the Muslim Brotherhood and Islamist forces in the Sinai Peninsula. And at some time we will have to conduct a strategic strike against Iran, but let’s not tell them we are coming and what the targets are!

We must develop better alliances with the minority ethnic groups friendly to America – Assyrians, Copts, Kurds and others. Yes, I support an independent Kurdistan, which would be a great friend to America.

We also need to promote American energy security. That means developing our own resources and telling OPEC and the Organization of Islamic Countries to take a hike. Lastly, let’s reaffirm our commitment to our best ally in the Middle East, Israel.

America needs strategists and leaders who know how to play chess, not checkers.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West

SPECIAL EDITION: Allen West Weekly Update 8/28/13 via @Next_GenTV


In Pursuit Of Martin Luther King’s Dream
He imagined opportunity, but we’re creating dependency


Today marks the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech. He delivered it five score years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, hence the decision to give it in Lincoln’s shadow at his memorial site in Washington, D.C.

Now we are two score and 10 years from the date of Dr. King’s monumental speech to ensure that the self-evident truth defined by Thomas Jefferson and echoed by Lincoln – “that all men are created equal” – lives up to its meaning. It is quite appropriate that the monuments to these three astute Americans are within eyeshot of each other.

However, where have we come in these 50 years and what should we celebrate on this anniversary? Have we achieved the dream Dr. King hoped we would? I say we are not there yet, and in some ways we have gone backward.

Blacks are chained in economic bondage

A half-century ago, Dr. King said: “The Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.”

Today there can be no doubt that we have highly successful blacks in all walks of life, but when we examine the state of America’s inner cities, we must all be appalled. Shall I say Detroit?

We have fought to break the chains of physical bondage, but the chains of economic bondage are even worse. This is not about social justice, but it is about ensuring that the economic opportunities of America can resurrect small-business entrepreneurship in the black community.

Our economic, tax and regulatory policies must promote free-market growth, innovation, ingenuity and investment. Instead, our policies are expanding the dependency society, not the opportunity society.

We need to promote the growth of small community banks to provide the capital for entrepreneurs in inner cities who have ideas in their heads and determination in their hearts. The Reagan administration pushed this philosophy via urban economic empowerment zones.

Dr. King also stated that “America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked insufficient funds.” Today, the government is issuing welfare by way of electronic benefits transfer cards and even recruiting people to enroll in the program. The government is issuing free cell phones.

This is not the dream Dr. King wanted us to live. As a matter of fact, Booker T. Washington built a three-pronged attack plan for the black community – education, entrepreneurship and self-reliance. That was Dr. King’s dream.

The travesties of black crime and abortion

If we had economic opportunities and better education – and remember, President Obama cancelled the latter when he killed the District of Columbia’s school voucher program – maybe we would not have the record high unemployment in the black community. The problem is especially acute among black teenagers, who it seems are so bored that they hunt down and kill innocent people.

Not far from Dr. King’s birthplace in Atlanta, a young black teenager sits accused of shooting a 13-month-old baby in the face. That is not part of the dream.

We also are witnessing the complete breakdown and collapse of the family, which was the foundational strength of the black community. Today, 72 percent of black children are born out of wedlock. That is not part of the dream.

Dr. King talked about the promissory note of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence and the guarantee of unalienable rights – life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. However, when it comes to life, over the past two score years, mothers have aborted some 13 million black babies. The black community would be 36 percent greater save for this tragedy, this genocide.

How many babies never got the chance to pursue Dr. King’s dream – the American dream? How many will never get to be among the next generation of doctors, lawyers, successful businessmen and women, prominent entertainers and sports figures. This travesty is certainly not part of Dr. King’s dream.

So where are the voices speaking up about these issues?

Booker T. Washington stated in 1911:

There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs – partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays.

Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances because they do not want to lose their jobs.

Living the dream and fighting to win it for others
My challenge is simple: Shall we just hear the same ole rhetorical speeches on the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s “dream” speech, or shall we sincerely assess where we have come since Aug. 28, 1963?

In 1961 when I was born in Atlanta, in the same neighborhood as Dr. King, my parents could not go to Fort Lauderdale Beach or Palm Beach Island in Florida. Fifty years, later I was sworn in to Congress to represent Florida’s 22d District, which included the coastline from Fort Lauderdale to Jupiter, including Palm Beach.

I was the first black Republican member of Congress from Florida since Josiah T. Walls in 1874. The election was not about the color of my skin; it was about the content of my character. How paradoxical, then, that John Lewis, who spoke on the famed day of Dr. King’s speech in 1963 and went on to serve in Congress (actually as my representative in Atlanta), campaigned against me in 2010.

I still have a dream, one deeply rooted in the American dream – for my two daughters, for the black community, for all Americans and those who seek liberty and freedom. My dream is not based upon servitude to the government but rather upon exceptionalism.

I have been to California, Colorado and New Hampshire. I was educated in Tennessee and born and raised in Georgia. I am promoting and living Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream by example – a dream that I was reminded of every time as a young boy walking past Ebenezer Baptist Church on Auburn Ave.

Now the next generation is depending on us to fulfill Dr. King’s dream and ensure the promise of the American dream for them.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West

Allen West | Weekly Update via @Next_GenTV | 8/23/13


The Indestructible Spirit Of America
Finding hope in glimpses of the next generation
Last week, I had the distinct pleasure and honor of addressing groups at the Ahavath Torah led by Rabbi Jon Hausman in Stoughton Mass., and at the annual GOP “Steak-Out” in Nashua, N.H. As a paratrooper, I always think it is fun to jump behind “enemy lines” and cause disruption and confusion.I got back to South Florida on Saturday evening and after my own landing later drove down to Fort Lauderdale airport to pick up our Chinese exchange student, Wangying Lin. Lin decided to come back and spend a second year with us, her senior year in high school.As we sat at the airport, my youngest daughter Austen and her best friend Morgan beamed with excitement. It was wonderful to see them run to Lin, and it warmed my heart when Lin ran to me shouting “Dad.” Who would have thought when I was born in Atlanta in 1961 that 52 years later, a 17-year-old Chinese girl would call me Dad?

As I drove back to Palm Beach Gardens, as Angela slept and as the girls chattered in the back of the H3 Hummer, I pondered America, THE “land of opportunity.”

Wangying Lin’s quest for opportunity

Lin came to us a year ago as a timid young lady, and I am quite sure she did not know what to expect. She arrived smack dab in the middle of lots of election-year excitement. I remember when Lin met GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney and his wife Ann at Traditions in Port St. Lucie, Fla. And the time we took Lin to a gun show in Fort Pierce, she was blown away at the freedoms and liberties we enjoy.Lin got a chance to see and truly experience America.What she experienced most was the chance to be rewarded for her hard academic work. She now wants to continue her education in America and become a lawyer. Lin has been an outstanding influence on Austen, who just a week ago told Angela and me that she, too, wants to be a lawyer.

I know, some of you think the last thing we need more of in America are lawyers. Never fear, Austen and Lin will possess high moral courage.

See, America is the place that no matter where you are born, no matter where you come from, you have opportunities to succeed if you just take them.

However, consider the paradox of a government that now openly recruits citizens to get “food stamps.” Yeah, they changed the name to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and now give you an electronic benefits transfer card, but it is all the same – actually with less accountability.

Lin has not come here to be part of the dependency society; she is here to taste the American dream. And as a young lady, she just makes me very proud.

Tomorrow’s leaders
So I continue my reflection of young people in America and just smile when I think of my visit with the Londonderry U.S. Naval Sea Cadets last Saturday. I spoke before about 15 of these outstanding young men and women and was just impressed.They asked me about my past and told me about their future dreams. Yeah, they all want to attend the U.S. Naval Academy.Think about how our culture and the media show us the worse of today’s American youth – the horrific shooting in Duncan, Okla., of 23-year-old Christopher Lane, the sentencing of Army Pvt. Bradley Manning, the trial of the black teenager accused of shooting a 13-month-old baby in the face, point blank. Stories like these bombard us almost daily, it seems.

However, before me that Saturday stood what is best about us (and their parents). This is why we must wholeheartedly support the U.S. Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, Young Marines and Sea Cadets programs.

This is where we find the next generation of American leaders. This is where it all started for me back in 1976 at Henry Grady High School in Atlanta.

No rest for the zealous
My weekend of witnessing astonishing young Americans was not complete in Londonderry. I was just humbled when Austen, Morgan and Lin all asked to go to church Sunday morning at Morgan’s Good Shepherd United Methodist Church in West Palm Beach. We got in at midnight from picking up Lin, but instead of desiring sleep, they wanted to attend church.And what an impressive service we witnessed. It was youth service Sunday, and the high school kids led the service – and I mean all of the service.They wore t-shirts depicting a diamond and the word “Undesirable” underneath, but the “Un” was crossed out. Seventeen-year-old Kaitlyn Bass delivered the message, centered on several scripture and the overall theme of Christ’s redeeming and empowering ability. Several young people offered their personal testimonies from the summer and their mission activities.

The service’s theme was zeal, and the related scripture was Romans 12:11, which reads, “Never be lacking in zeal, but keep your spiritual fervor, serving the Lord.”

As I sat writing this missive, I realized that heartfelt zeal, a love of and service to God and country, has kept America great over the past 237 years. That is what my own parents imparted to me.

Confidence born of God-given rights
See, regardless of being bombarded by the progressive, secular, socialist culture and media, America truly is indestructible. Our spiritual fervor is rooted in knowing that our unalienable rights emanate from our Creator, not government.Based upon President Obama’s weekly address last weekend, many Americans have reason to be concerned that he seemingly believes the opposite – that man is the giver, and indeed taker, of our rights. As I spoke to folks in Stoughton and Nashua, several times adults told me they are scared, nervous and losing hope.Well, rest assured, I saw the next generation in action this last week – the Londonderry Navy Sea Cadets, the young people at Good Shepherd United Methodist Church and the young women in my own home. The challenge is simple: Shall we, the current generation, lose our zeal of ensuring that the journey to the American dream for the next generation does not end on our watch.

To Obama and the liberal, progressive, secular, socialist establishment, we say “Molon labe!” America, and the next generation, is secure because America is an indestructible spirit that is blessed by Divine providence.

Be looking for a special Wednesday edition of this newsletter next week as we mark the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech, and you will see a momentous manifestation of that spirit on display.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West


Allen West’s Weekly Wrap Up | via @Next_GenTV | 8/16/13


The Troubled American Ship Of State – The captain and crew have navigated us into a nightmare

It is great to be back, as I was away for 10 days as an invited guest speaker on the National Review summer cruise. We embarked from Amsterdam and headed into the North Sea toward the epic scenery of Norway. The discussions were informative, and the speakers were truly exceptional.We had an enjoyable family vacation aboard Holland America Line’s MS Eurodam, returning late last Thursday. My daughters Aubrey and Austen wanted to have family movie night Saturday. They requested the 1958 classic “The Vikings,” with Kirk Douglass, Tony Curtis, Ernest Borgnine and Janet Leigh.They especially wanted to see the scenes of the Viking ships sailing the fjords to compare them with what they had just witnessed. They also wanted to look at the Viking culture and weapons in the movie to compare with the Norwegian history center exhibit on the Vikings at Avaldsnes that we had seen near Haugesund.

However, as I watched the movie – yes, for the millionth time – I pondered how the Vikings were afraid of the fog in the North Sea. They were great shipbuilders, but their navigational skills were confined to hugging along the coastline. Navigating the open seas was a perilous challenge.

Thanks to modern technology, as we were on the MS Eurodam, I was able to tune into a station on the TV set in our stateroom to see the exact location and heading of our vessel and to see the fore and aft camera views. But in an interesting paradox, it was much easier to dock a Viking ship centuries ago than it is a large cruise ship today – and those waterways are still the same.

I began to think about the impeccable responsibility of the ship’s captain, now and then. The incredible art of seamanship to maneuver and navigate a ship on the open seas still is based upon fundamentals.

The fog of economic ruin

I am now back in Washington, and as I did my early morning runs this week, I asked myself, “Who is piloting the American ship of state?”On a ship, someone is always on watch, 24/7. Well, who is on watch for America? Who is on the bridge manning the helm, and who is the captain ready to take responsibility and be held accountable for the movements of the ship?Last week I watched President Obama give his first solo press conference since April. Needless to say, as the ship he is piloting drifts closer to the rocks, he was not reassuring to the crew or passengers.

We have a healthcare law that is about to impart serious economic ruin on an American economy struggling with a mere 1 percent increase in quarterly gross domestic product. The president himself has ordered several parts of the law’s implementation to be delayed – an action that is beyond his constitutional ability.

The law is as unpopular as ever and for the ship’s passengers (the American people) to know that certain members of the crew (Congress and its staff) have certain exemptions and will receive subsidies is beyond comprehension.

‘Phony scandals’ that are sinking America
Last September, our ship of state received a distress call – “man overboard,” if you will. As an American ambassador was attacked and the call went to the ship’s captain, it seems he was too busy to be bothered – ya know, formal night dinner – and instructed other senior crew members to respond.Against orders, some of the deck crew went overboard to save the one individual, but the ship never stopped, never turned about, never launched a rescue vessel. And the ship’s captain announced to the crew and passengers that the incident was a “phony scandal.”Think about the old days of the Vikings raiding along the English coast. What if England’s feudal kings had told their subjects, “The Vikings have been decimated and are on the run, no longer a threat.” However, when further Viking raids occurred, they told the serfs and simple farmers those were different Vikings. So it is with al Qaeda, according to our American ship’s captain.

And based upon recent developments emanating from Syria, al Qaeda is stronger than ever and establishing a new base. The Muslim Brotherhood, the granddaddy of Islamism, also is not backing down in Egypt.

So we shut our embassies and consulates in what can be only interpreted in the Islamic world as fear and cowardice. See, an embassy is a sovereign piece of American territory, but we basically abandoned ship.

Skipper Obama and Gilligan Reid
But have no fear, the good Skipper Obama has a dedicated and loyal Gilligan in Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., who in his babbling sense hinted that non-support for Obama’s failing policies is rooted in racism.I, for one, do not want to be on a fateful trip through the fog of failed economic and national security policies, nanny-state growth, and a culture of incompetence, corruption and intimidation through which our current ship of state is sailing. I and many other Americans do not want to end up on a deserted island devoid of the promise of the American dream for our next generation.That desire has nothing to do with the president’s racial complexion; it has everything to do with competence and character.

The next generation deserves a captain who takes responsibility and who is willing to man the bridge and give the right course headings to the helmsman. From the days of the Vikings, who sailed the open seas to find Iceland, Greenland and even America, until today, great ships have had great captains.

Our American ship of state does not resemble the MS Eurodam, which I disembarked from safely. It more closely resembles the Costa Concordia, which still lies half-sunk in the Tyrrhenian Sea because a captain ran it upon Italy’s rocks.

If Washington is the bridge of our ship, no one is on duty and we are dangerously close to the rocks.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West

Allen West | Weekly Wrap Up on @Next_GenTV | 8/9/13

What Norway Teaches Us About America –  Allen West reflects on our principles and past while abroad

Col. Allen West is still traveling this week as part of National Review’s annual cruise, but to keep his readers in the loop, he has been sending observations from his stops along the North Sea. Here are two dispatches from Norway:

Bergen (Aug. 3) – Bergen is a lovely city, the second largest in Norway behind the capital of Oslo. Bergen was once the capital of the country.

It is also the home of famous classical composer Edvard Grieg, known for his Peer Gynt suite. We visited the Kode Art Gallery and saw the works of Edvard Munch, who is known for the “Scream” series.

It rains an average 219 days a year in Bergen, and boy howdy were we caught in a deluge. But later in the afternoon, the clouds blew over and a beautiful day shone down on the City of the Seven Mountains.

I learned that Norway has a state-sponsored religion, Evangelical Lutheran, and that the head of the state is also head of the church as part of its constitution. However, Norwegians still have freedom of religion.

Our founding fathers did not want America to have a head of state who also leads a religion. This is what “separation of church and state” means.

Stavenger (Aug. 6) – What a beautiful, breathtaking scene this city offers. The port is right in the city center below the old city.

We took a nice cruise through Lysefjord, and the pristine simplicity was spellbinding. We went by a small island where, in 998 AD, King Olaf held a meeting to unify the separate kingdoms into the Norway we know today.

The greatness of America is that those who left Norway came to our shores and found a place to be free, share their culture and be part of the immense opportunities our republic offers, allowing their entrepreneurship and ethic to strengthen our country.

America is exceptional because as a young, inner-city black kid from Atlanta, I got to experience Norway and its history with my wife and our daughters, the next generation.

Steadfast and Loyal,


Libertarian Voices Of The House GOP
The libertarian wing of the Republican Party has spent a long time in the political wilderness but is now the future of the GOP, Rep. Mick Mulvaney said at a panel discussion with three of his fellow libertarian-leaning House colleagues.

“You are the swing voters, and you are the folks that move easily back and forth between the parties and have no natural party lines,” the South Carolina Republican said. He added that libertarianism is the growth area of the party, as it was when Ronald Reagan ran against “country club Republicans.”

Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., said the ascendancy of libertarian Republicans is evident in the reaction of House GOP leaders to young lawmakers like him. Their commitment to limited government and individual liberty frustrates the establishment’s desire to compromise, he said.

“The party is changing right in front of them,” Amash said, “and I think that’s why you get a lot of backlash from some of the more senior members who are set in their ways about what the Republican Party should stand for.”

That’s true in the Senate as well, he added, where Republicans like Ted Cruz of Texas, Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky take principled stands against the party’s leaders when necessary.

Rep. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, criticized Republicans like Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey and Sen. John McCain of Arizona for their willingness to align themselves with Democrats. “What you’re looking at is people that are only interested in themselves and not interested in actually promoting the cause,” Labrador said.

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., also spoke at the event. Click the video to hear what economist inspired him to become politically active. You’ll be surprised.

A Texas-sized Fight Over Voting Rights
Texas will need a big bankroll to fight the Obama administration’s push to reinstate strict federal scrutiny of the state’s voting laws but has a strong case, according to election law expert Hans von Spakovsky.

“They’re going to put up a pretty fierce battle to try to stop this,” he said of Texas officials, noting that South Carolina spent $3.5 million to win a similar battle against U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder.
Von Spakovsky discussed the genesis of the dispute, the history behind it and the legal dynamics at play in an interview with Michelle Fields of NextGeneration.TV.
Holder targeted Texas after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in June that the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which requires Southern states to get federal approval before changing their voting laws, is no longer constitutional.
“The Supreme Court threw it out because the coverage formula … was based on 40-year-old data,” von Spakovsky said. “It had never been updated by Congress, and the conditions are a lot different today.”
But Holder refused to admit defeat. He sued the state under another section of the Voting Rights Act to try to reinstate federal pre-clearance of voting laws in Texas for another decade. The Justice Department is upset that Texas enacted a law requiring voters to present photo identification, von Spakovsky said.
He critiqued the federal government’s rationale for the lawsuit, including allegations of long voting lines for blacks and Hispanics in Texas. But he said Holder won’t stop fighting even if he loses in Texas.

Allen West | Weekly Wrap Up on @Next_GenTV | 8/2/13

Sailing The Conservative Seas
Allen West is away on the annual National Review cruise
This week, Col. Allen West is sailing the North Sea with National Review. In between stops along Norway’s coast, West, Rich Lowry, Jonah Goldberg and others are entertaining guests with panels, special “insider” sessions and possibly a card game or two. He will return Aug. 12.
Here’s his message before he cast off:
I could not be more humbled at this esteemed opportunity to address a gathering of solid conservatives. Angela, Aubrey, Austen and I arrived in Amsterdam on Wednesday morning. We had a great time walking the old city and taking in the sights, such as Anne Frank’s house and the museums of Rembrandt and Van Gogh.I noticed the many churches and cathedrals that are no longer used as such. There is no doubt the secular humanist movement has taken hold in Holland and is reflected in Amsterdam – and probably the entire European continent. That is quite a contrast to the millions of young Catholics who gathered in Brazil to see Pope Francis. We in America must stand guard against the creep of secular humanist progressives who are attacking religious freedoms.

As we pulled out of the port, it struck me that my life has become the intersection of two great champions of civil rights and conservatism: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and William F. Buckley Jr. I was born and raised in Dr. King’s neighborhood in Atlanta, and now I’m cruising for the magazine first published by Buckley in 1955. Nowhere other than America could this story be told. Equality of opportunity, not outcomes, is the American way, the American dream.

The family is out on the deck as we make our way out of the channel to the North Sea. I have always admired the Viking warrior culture. Now I get to visit their homeland. One of my favorite movies was “The Vikings,” with Kurt Douglas, Tony Curtis and Ernest Borgnine. The History Channel series “Vikings” was doggone good as well.

I wish you all well and will be providing some Facebook updates on the excursion.

Steadfast and Loyal,


WESTern Conservative Summit Call To Action
West delivered remarks at the Centennial Institute’s Western Conservative Summit in Denver last weekend to call conservatives to action.”Let’s stop talking and start walking,” West said on Sunday. “Let’s live up to the faith and courage of Psalms and the wisdom of Proverbs, and let our spirits be lifted high, known to all men, all women, all Americans, all of our allies and in all corners of the globe. Let’s forge a new generation … that guarantees the American dream for another 200 years.”

Watch his full remarks here: http://youtu.be/3dj4wLeNgEs.


Allen West Weekly Update | @Next_GenTV | July 26, 2013


Serene Reflections of America – Two men, soldiers and fathers, find perspective on the trail

Last weekend my wife Angela and our daughters decided to take a trip to Jamaica to visit extended family. Of course when you have aunts, uncles and cousins in Jamaica, you are going to have a nice time because it is less expensive and you really get to see the Island.I hunkered down Washington, D.C., over the weekend but linked up with my former brigade commander from Fort Bragg, retired Col. Denny R. Lewis. We went hiking on the Appalachian Trail. (And yes, unlike former South Carolina Gov. and now-U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford, I was on the Appalachian Trail and not in South America. I took pictures to prove it.Denny and I headed out I-66 West on Saturday about 0630 down. We exited I-66 at Virginia Highway 55. About two miles down that road is an entrance to the Appalachian Trail near Linden, Va.We headed north on the trail toward two campsites, Manassas Gap and Dick’s Dome. It was a perfect morning – not too hot and a decent breeze through the trees as we began our ascent. We planned for a four-hour hike, with backpacks full of water, energy bars and the ole trusted peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches.

As we hiked, I remembered the times when as a student at the University of Tennessee we walked in the Great Smoky Mountains. The peace, the serenity, just affords one a time to reflect. For Denny and me, our serene reflections were of our America. On a day when there were those calling for protests all over America, two men, one white from West Virginia and the other black from inner city Atlanta, reflected on “old-school values.”

Old-school values worth remembering

Denny recalled how hobos during his youth came around and asked for work to get something to eat. They did not feel entitled to get something but wanted to offer a service for sustainment. He reflected upon how his small local community came together to support a family in need or distress. It was the community’s responsibility to help a neighbor in need.I told him that today the government is in the business of promoting distress and dependency for political gain. One need only look at the explosion in food stamp recipients and poverty in America over the past 5 years.Denny thought about the folks who came to pay their respects when his Mom passed away. They brought whatever they thought would soothe and comfort the family. He remembered one fella who brought some fresh “shine,” and he laughed as he remembered how good it tasted.When we both reflected upon the foundation of our country, the American family, our conversation really became animated. We both remembered the days when children were a reflection upon their parents and their reputations.

When I was growing up, one of the worse beat downs I got from my Dad was when we were visiting his hometown of Cuthbert, Ga., in Randolph County. I had been walking back from the store and playing some basketball, and when I got home, word had spread that Buck West’s boy Allen was disrespectful because he did not speak to the old folks sitting on their porches.

I had committed the ultimate sin, according to the old-school ways. I had been disrespectful in not addressing my elders. I had not given the simple recognition of “Hello, ma’am,” Hello, sir,” “Afternoon, sir,” or “Afternoon, ma’am.” And the insinuation was that my Dad was raising a disrespectful son.

Last Friday, President Obama stated that as a black man, he was followed at malls and shopping centers, had doors clicked when he crossed the street, and watched women clutch their handbags when he entered elevators with them. Well, perhaps, thanks to that one experience I had in Cuthbert, Ga., I never shared Obama’s experiences. Perhaps having parents who insisted that I be a respectful young man made the difference.

True measures of toughness

As we hiked, Denny and I reflected on how great it would be to have young black men in the inner city hike the Appalachian Trail for a day and spend a night – to expose them to the serenity and beauty of America instead of the chaos and despair that they witness every day in their neighborhoods.We agreed that toughness is not about cursing loud, joining a gang or killing someone in your neighborhood. If these young men are so adamant about killing people, they can focus their energy on a very determined enemy.Toughness is being pinned down by the enemy in a compound in Afghanistan, picking up a grenade thrown into that compound to protect your fellow paratroopers, and throwing it out only to have it explode as it leaves your hand – a now-prosthetic hand that I once shook.Toughness is disobeying orders and charging toward the sound of guns to rescue fellow Marines pinned down by heavy enemy fire or State Department officials under attack.

Toughness is looking at your family and telling them you have to go and take your post on freedom’s rampart to safeguard liberty, not knowing if that is the last time you will see them.

We can develop real toughness by gathering a group of young, inner-city black men, giving them a map, having them load supplies and telling them they have a certain amount of hours to reach a shelter and prepare their food for the evening while also ensuring they secure their site.

This past Saturday, the race-baiters just created more noise, more chaos, and still more young black men died in Chicago. What if we had decided to round up young black men and take them out for a hike? What if we had decided to take them away from the chaos and give them a place of respite where we could talk in peace and reflection?

When are we going to stop addressing the symptoms and treat the disease, the illness that afflicts the black community – the breakdown of families. Members of the black community can be angry all they want, but Bill O’Reilly of Fox News was right in a poignant “Talking Points Memo” commentary this week.

Role models for the next generation

As two American men from different backgrounds, Denny and I shared the experience of parents, Dads, who raised us to be the men we are today.While we were on the Appalachian Trail, we met a recent college graduate named Steph from Massachusetts. She started hiking the trail May 28 in Georgia. She was alone on the trail because her male hiking partner, John, had allowed her to go off alone. Denny and I ran into John after seeing Steph a second time at Manassas Gap shelter crossroads. She had left him a message.As two Dads with two daughters, Denny and I pondered chivalry and what we would have done to ole John if he had allowed our daughters to be alone on the Appalachian Trail. Nope, our musings were not an indictment of Steph as a capable young woman and a hiker. They were a reflection upon what it meant to us to be chivalrous men as opposed to what that seems to mean today.The next generation needs moments of serene reflection, and it needs us as parents to demand a higher standard, not the standard of low expectations that this culture will inculcate into their lives.

The next generation in the black community needs less voices yelling and less chaos that reinforces the soft bigotry of low expectations. It needs more role models who will expose them to the serene moments of reflection, responsibility and respect.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West


Allen West’s Weekly Wrap up | @Next_GenTV | July 17, 2013

Real vs. Politically Manufactured Priorities – What is the legacy for the next generation in the black community?
This week we have seen our nation become enthralled with last weekend’s news of George Zimmerman being found “not guilty” in the Trayvon Martin trial. There has been monumental media coverage of this case, trial, and now in the aftermath of the jury verdict.

This was a tragic event; a young man lost his life.

I ask if all this media attention is part of race-based politics resulting from misguided priorities?

Race Baiters Weighting the Court of Public Opinion
Perhaps, if there had been less external influencers advocating for their warped vision — or version — of social justice, the legal system could have proceeded and done what was expected. But when the race baiters become engaged and place their demands upon the system, the system cannot operate objectively.

Was a young unarmed man shot and killed?


Was there undo pressure to create charges that created stipulations and conditions that would be difficult for the prosecution to present?


It is clearly evident that with all the media, advocacy groups, and government involvement, this case was being tried not in a courthouse but in the arena of public opinion even before it reached trial. Then when the case finally went to trial it became transparently clear, at least to some, that “legally” this was going to be a heavy lift.

The outside voices pushed this to be a second-degree murder charge, a charge that puts a much higher burden upon the prosecution. Or perhaps, in certain circles in America, we have come to a place where we do not believe in “innocent until proven guilty.” The responsibility of the prosecution was to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt; they were unable to do so.

The Federal Government as Pawn of Special Interests
Now, in the aftermath, we see the external actors not learning their lesson but pressing their case. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid prodded the United States Department of Justice to take a look into the case. “This isn’t over,” Sen. Reid told NBC’s Meet the Press.

The NAACP immediately asked the U.S. Department of Justice to file civil rights charges against George Zimmerman. Funny, they were really silent when former DOJ attorney J. Christian Adams wrote that the prosecution was triggered by threats from the head of the New Black Panther Party.

The Congressional Black Caucus released a statement saying Trayvon Martin’s civil rights were violated. Where is the evidence?

Does it concern anyone other than myself to hear politicians and advocacy groups seeking to use the federal government to guarantee their desired outcomes, their version of justice?

If we are a constitutional republic that regards the system of federalism and states’ rights as preeminent, then should we be using the federal government as a battering ram? Yes, there are times when the federal government should intercede and those instances are outlined clearly in the U.S. Constitution.

Just as we see cherry-picking of laws to enforce by the federal government, the last thing we need is for the federal government to cherry-pick which cases deserve its attention.

General Holder & Booker T. Washington
This week Attorney General Holder made several references during speeches to the predominantly black Delta Sigma Theta sorority and NAACP conventions expressing sympathy for the Trayvon Martin’s parents. I find it interesting that Holder was not so concerned for the parents of deceased Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry as a result of Operation Fast and Furious.

The Justice Department has set up a website for “tips” on the issue of a civil rights probe after the FBI conducted an extensive investigation and found no animus of racial hatred, and even the prosecution in the trial stated it was not about race.

We should not have certain media commentators with a very questionable past becoming the leading voices that only use inflammatory language for their own personal relevance.

In 1911 Booker T. Washington stated, “There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs-partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs.”

The class to which this great leader refers is maintaining the media spectacle at the expense of the major concerns of the black community.

What Are the Real Crises in the Black Community?
While tragic, Trayvon Martin’s death should not be the reason that the black community is marching in the streets. Black unemployment, gang crime, health problems, and abortion rates are plagues upon black people across the country.

Let’s first look at the shooting murder of 16-year-old Darryl Green who last Thursday was found lying facedown in an abandoned house in Chicago’s south side Englewood neighborhood. It seems this young man refused to join a gang … And what do you hear?


In April, De’Marquise Elkins, 17, and Dominique Lang, 15, both pleaded “not guilty” to theMarch 21st shooting of 13-month-old Antonio Santiago during a robbery of his Mother in Brunswick Georgia. And what do you hear?


The unemployment rate for blacks is at an all-time high and the black teenage unemployment rate is epic. Yet when a group like the Black American Leadership Alliance stands up against the current Senate immigration legislation (S.744) articulating its adverse affects on the black community in letters to the Senate and Congressional Black Caucus and by holding a rally in DC this past week, what do you hear?


Since 1973 Black American deaths have emanated from*:

AIDS: 203,695
Violent Crimes: 306,313
Accidents: 370,723
Cancer: 1,638,350
Heart Disease: 2,266,789
Abortion: 13,000,000

*All figures are based upon cumulative statistics by the US Center for Disease Control (CDC)

Please watch our Next Generation.TV video on this. 

The incidence of abortion in the black community has resulted in a tremendous loss of life, but you will only get chirping from the Congressional Black Caucus or the NAACP unless you go to websites like BlackGenocide.org or the National Black Catholic Congress.

We are talking about a black community that could be close to 36 percent larger. I do believe in research for ovarian, cervix, uterus cancers and treatment for fibroid tumors that promote better reproductive health for women.

So what are the real priorities in the black community? Politically manufactured crises, as pushed by the race-baiting, faux leaders in the black community, propped up by progressive socialists and the complicit media?

Just take a walk through any inner city neighborhood and ask yourself what is the legacy for the next generation in the black community.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West

Allen West’s Weekly Update via Next Generation TV 7/12/13

Our Perplexing Hypocrisy – America celebrates liberty while embracing its enemies

Last week on the Fourth of July, the 237th anniversary of our independence, I sat watching parts two and three of the HBO mini-series “John Adams.” As we know, or I hope you know, part two ended with the reading of Thomas Jefferson’s brilliant words in the Declaration of Independence.

I began to think about what had transpired far from my simple home in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., some 24 hours earlier – in Egypt.It was as if the young people of Egypt – and almost 70 percent of that nation is younger than 30 – heard the words of Jefferson and realized that it was upon them to sever political bands and that their government no longer had the consent of the governed. They had come to understand that part of democracy is their ability to petition their government for redress of grievances. These young people, and others, realized they do not have to settle and accept a tyranny greater than what they had previously endured.One-fifth of Egypt, some 20 million people, took to the streets and let the world see and hear them. They clamored for liberty and freedom. They sought a better future for their country. They realized that a strict, Islamist sharia state is not in their best interests.

They actually taught us a lesson – that election by democratic process does not ensure a democracy. One would think we would have learned that lesson after Hamas was “elected” in the Gaza Strip.

A military that with all its might could have enacted a vicious and bloody action in Egypt decided to be the true caretakers of the country. Soldiers acted as guardians of the people, recognizing their true role and responsibility – to serve and protect, to perhaps ensure a brighter future for their own children and maybe restore Egypt to a greatness that it once possessed.

American principles on display in Egypt
Some people are debating the question of coup or revolution? Well, ask the people on the street in Egypt. As for my view, if we use our own American Revolution as a paradigm, the inquiry answers itself.In the twinkling of an eye, we saw a reflection of the principles for which America was founded, a respect and regard for the rights of individual – life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.I do not portend to predict the future, but I wish Egyptians well in changing the course of their country and perhaps making it a beacon for the Islamic world. Yes, I do believe we can coexist, but I will not compromise my principles and commitment to freedom to the intolerant.

See, I believe that when tolerance becomes a one-way street, it leads to cultural suicide – and I am certainly not a willing sheep offering my throat to the wolves.

I am proud of the actions taken in Egypt to expel the Muslim Brotherhood from power. I am proud of the young people in Turkey who are taking a stand against autocratic Islamism. I am proud of the young Iranians of the Green Movement who stand for a new way forward, one without the rule of the Rasputin-like clerics, mullahs and ayatollahs.

I am proud of young women like Julie Aftab (see her Profile in Courage story below) and Malala Yousafzai, who have stood against unimaginable hate and assault but evidenced true courage to us.

However, I see a very perplexing hypocrisy. Here in America, which is supposed to be the symbol and beacon of liberty and freedom, we find people embracing what young freedom lovers in the Middle East stand against. We have masked it under the guise of tolerance and multiculturalism.

A pattern of disturbing behavior
I find it utterly disturbing that our government openly consults with organizations that have ties to the Muslim Brotherhood. Several of them were among the 57 Islamic organizations that in October 2011 sent a letter to then-Obama administration counter-terrorism adviser John Brennan demanding the “purging” of training materials they deemed offensive.I find it disturbing that the Obama administration supports U.N. Resolution 16/18, which, as promoted by the Organization of Islamic Countries, would castigate as blasphemy any “speech” about Islam deemed offensive to radical Islamists.It is truly perplexing that our own National Security Council senior staff would invite radical Islamist cleric Sheik bin Bayyah into the White House for a chat and on the same day, June 13, announce arms support to Islamist rebels in Syria – who 10 days later beheaded a Catholic priest, Father Francois Durad.

On our college campuses we find radical Islamic organizations such as the Muslim Students Association and American professors who viciously attack Jewish students and openly support Palestinian terrorist organizations – and we embrace them. As a matter of fact, the Obama administration has nominated for U.S. ambassador to the U.N. one Samantha Power, who has advocated for a massive American force to impose a pro-Palestinian will against Israel.

How is it that here in America we find instances of radical Islamism and jihadism right under our noses, yet we are recalcitrant to declare it so. The Tsarnaevs, Carlos Bledsoe, Anwar al-Awlaki, Maj. Nidal Hasan and instances of honor killings have infiltrated our shores.

Those of us who stand against Islamic totalitarianism are attacked as being “Islamophobic.” Is it not a perplexing hypocrisy that the United Kingdom would ban two Americans, Pamela Geller and Robert Spencer, not even two months after the savage, broad-daylight beheading and hacking to death of a U.K. soldier, Lee Rigby, by declared Nigerian Islamists, jihadists? British Prime Minister David Cameron made every possible excuse to appease those who see appeasement as an aphrodisiac.

An admonition for Americans
I find it perplexing that President Obama did not support the Iranian Green Movement and that he demanded that former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak step down yet openly congratulated the Muslim Brotherhood’s president, Mohammed Morsi. All one need do is to read the Muslim Brotherhood charter to know its global intent to establish sharia dominance.The perplexing hypocrisy is that on the eve of our celebration of American independence, the people of Egypt stood against radical Islamic tyranny while we are embracing it and punishing those who speak against it.Our next generation should take note of the young people of Iran, Turkey and Egypt. Stop being uninformed drones who are only concerned about the next party or season of “American Idol” or who got dance moves.

And our current generation, and indeed across Western civilization, should take heed and find the courage exemplified by the 20 million who said no to radical Islamists, no to the Muslim Brotherhood – just as we said no to King George III and mmonarchical tyranny 237 years ago.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West