READ Allen West’s Op-Ed “How MLK’s Dream Got Derailed”

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How MLK’s Dream Got Derailed

Liberal politics is preventing the black community from fulfilling the vision of the March on Washington

By 

Today marks the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous, “I Have a Dream” speech. Dr. King delivered that monumental speech to ensure that the words of Thomas Jefferson, “We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal,” lived up to their meaning, just as Lincoln sought to do. It is therefore quite appropriate that the monuments to these three astute Americans are within eyeshot of each other.

However, where have we come in these 50 years and what is legacy of that speech today?

Dr. King postulated that, “the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.”

There can be no doubt that we have highly successful blacks in all walks of life, but when we examine the state of America’s inner cities we must all be appalled; shall I say Detroit?

We have fought to break the chains of physical bondage, but today the chains of economic bondage are even worse. This is not about social justice but about ensuring that the economic opportunities of America can resurrect small business entrepreneurship in the black community. Our economic, tax, and regulatory policies must promote free market growth, investment, innovation and ingenuity to enable self-reliance.

We need to promote the growth of our small community banks in order to provide the capital for those in our inner cities with an idea in their heads and determination in their hearts. The Reagan administration proposed such an initiative – urban economic empowerment zones.

Dr. King stated that, “America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked insufficient funds.” Today, the government is issuing electronic benefits transfer cards and even recruiting for enrollment. The government is issuing free cell phones. This is not the dream King wanted, the nightmare of dependence.

North of Dr. King’s birthplace in Atlanta, a young black teenager sits accused of shooting a 13-month-old baby in the face. We know of the killings in Duncan, Okla.,  and Spokane, Wash., the murders in Chicago and the school bus beating in Gulfport, Fla. Black males comprise 6 to 7 percent of the American population but are responsible for nearly 55 percent of violent crimes … that is not part of the dream.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING THIS OP-ED BY ALLEN WEST: US NEWS

SPECIAL EDITION: Allen West Weekly Update 8/28/13 via @Next_GenTV

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In Pursuit Of Martin Luther King’s Dream
He imagined opportunity, but we’re creating dependency

 

Today marks the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech. He delivered it five score years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, hence the decision to give it in Lincoln’s shadow at his memorial site in Washington, D.C.

Now we are two score and 10 years from the date of Dr. King’s monumental speech to ensure that the self-evident truth defined by Thomas Jefferson and echoed by Lincoln – “that all men are created equal” – lives up to its meaning. It is quite appropriate that the monuments to these three astute Americans are within eyeshot of each other.

However, where have we come in these 50 years and what should we celebrate on this anniversary? Have we achieved the dream Dr. King hoped we would? I say we are not there yet, and in some ways we have gone backward.

Blacks are chained in economic bondage

A half-century ago, Dr. King said: “The Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.”

Today there can be no doubt that we have highly successful blacks in all walks of life, but when we examine the state of America’s inner cities, we must all be appalled. Shall I say Detroit?

We have fought to break the chains of physical bondage, but the chains of economic bondage are even worse. This is not about social justice, but it is about ensuring that the economic opportunities of America can resurrect small-business entrepreneurship in the black community.

Our economic, tax and regulatory policies must promote free-market growth, innovation, ingenuity and investment. Instead, our policies are expanding the dependency society, not the opportunity society.

We need to promote the growth of small community banks to provide the capital for entrepreneurs in inner cities who have ideas in their heads and determination in their hearts. The Reagan administration pushed this philosophy via urban economic empowerment zones.

Dr. King also stated that “America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked insufficient funds.” Today, the government is issuing welfare by way of electronic benefits transfer cards and even recruiting people to enroll in the program. The government is issuing free cell phones.

This is not the dream Dr. King wanted us to live. As a matter of fact, Booker T. Washington built a three-pronged attack plan for the black community – education, entrepreneurship and self-reliance. That was Dr. King’s dream.

The travesties of black crime and abortion

If we had economic opportunities and better education – and remember, President Obama cancelled the latter when he killed the District of Columbia’s school voucher program – maybe we would not have the record high unemployment in the black community. The problem is especially acute among black teenagers, who it seems are so bored that they hunt down and kill innocent people.

Not far from Dr. King’s birthplace in Atlanta, a young black teenager sits accused of shooting a 13-month-old baby in the face. That is not part of the dream.

We also are witnessing the complete breakdown and collapse of the family, which was the foundational strength of the black community. Today, 72 percent of black children are born out of wedlock. That is not part of the dream.

Dr. King talked about the promissory note of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence and the guarantee of unalienable rights – life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. However, when it comes to life, over the past two score years, mothers have aborted some 13 million black babies. The black community would be 36 percent greater save for this tragedy, this genocide.

How many babies never got the chance to pursue Dr. King’s dream – the American dream? How many will never get to be among the next generation of doctors, lawyers, successful businessmen and women, prominent entertainers and sports figures. This travesty is certainly not part of Dr. King’s dream.

So where are the voices speaking up about these issues?

Booker T. Washington stated in 1911:

There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs – partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays.

Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances because they do not want to lose their jobs.

Living the dream and fighting to win it for others
My challenge is simple: Shall we just hear the same ole rhetorical speeches on the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s “dream” speech, or shall we sincerely assess where we have come since Aug. 28, 1963?

In 1961 when I was born in Atlanta, in the same neighborhood as Dr. King, my parents could not go to Fort Lauderdale Beach or Palm Beach Island in Florida. Fifty years, later I was sworn in to Congress to represent Florida’s 22d District, which included the coastline from Fort Lauderdale to Jupiter, including Palm Beach.

I was the first black Republican member of Congress from Florida since Josiah T. Walls in 1874. The election was not about the color of my skin; it was about the content of my character. How paradoxical, then, that John Lewis, who spoke on the famed day of Dr. King’s speech in 1963 and went on to serve in Congress (actually as my representative in Atlanta), campaigned against me in 2010.

I still have a dream, one deeply rooted in the American dream – for my two daughters, for the black community, for all Americans and those who seek liberty and freedom. My dream is not based upon servitude to the government but rather upon exceptionalism.

I have been to California, Colorado and New Hampshire. I was educated in Tennessee and born and raised in Georgia. I am promoting and living Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream by example – a dream that I was reminded of every time as a young boy walking past Ebenezer Baptist Church on Auburn Ave.

Now the next generation is depending on us to fulfill Dr. King’s dream and ensure the promise of the American dream for them.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West

Allen West “This nation elected a black president, not once but twice. Have we come far since the abolition of slavery, and Dr. King’s march 50 years ago?”

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by Allen West via Facebook

In 1961 when I was born in Atlanta in Dr King’s neighborhood, my parents would not have been allowed on Ft. Lauderdale beach or Palm Beach Island. Fifty years later, I was sworn in as the Congressional Representative of those same beaches. This nation elected a black president, not once but twice. Have we come far since the abolition of slavery, and Dr. King‘s march 50 years ago? Absolutely, but when we examine the state of America’s inner cities, we must all be appalled. Dr. King talked about the Declaration of Independence and the guarantee of unalienable rights of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. But when it comes to life, over the past two score years, some 13 million black babies have been aborted. The black community would be 36% greater if not for this tragedy, this genocide. How many babies never got the chance to experience King’s dream, the American dream? And why are there so few voices speaking up on these issues? In the last 50 years we have witnessed the complete breakdown and collapse of what once was the foundational strength of the black community, the family. We fought to break the chains of physical bondage, but today the chains of economic and social bondage are even greater.

MLK

Representative Allen West VIDEO speaking to Kings Academy on SOPA and Net Neutrality

The King’s Academy, a leader of private Christian schools in Palm Beach county, Florida, invites world-class speakers to speak to its students. This video shows U.S. Representative Allen West (R-FL) who spoke at the School on January 10, 2012.

Uploaded by on Jan 11, 2012

HatTip: TheRightScoop

 

 

Rep Allen West Editorial “Mr. President, please don’t play the race card in 2012”

by Congressman Allen West

Mr. President, please don’t play the race card in 2012

Congressman Allen B. West

I was born in the inner city of Atlanta in 1961, when segregation was still rife, at a time when I would have been barred from visiting the very beaches that make up part of the congressional district I so proudly represent.

Just two years after my birth, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. momentously described his dream that one day his children would “live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but the content of their character.”

How proud he would have been on that November Tuesday in 2008 when Barack Obama was elected the 44th President of the United States. Clearly, Dr. King’s dream had come true. White voters across America had judged our President by the content of his character, not the color of his skin, and elected a man of color, whose very lineage with a black African father and white American mother, was a literal manifestation of the figurative melting pot of these United States.

The inauguration of our first black President, the highest office in the land, and perhaps the world’s most powerful office, clearly demonstrated to the world that race need not be a hindrance to success and achievement in America. The fact that Barack Obama won the largest share of white support of any Democrat in a two-man race since 1976 indicated the lion’s share of these voters made their decision based on his character, his vision of hope and change, and his ability to relate with everyday Americans.

Still, let us not ignore that white Democrats aren’t the only voters who are capable of making a decision based on character rather than color.

In the 2010 election cycle, 42 black Republicans were vying for seats in the House of Representatives, and 14 of them made it to the general election. Two of those candidates, myself as well as Tim Scott from South Carolina, carried that success all the way to the House of Representatives. I represent a Congressional District where more than 90 percent of my constituents are not black. A powerful movement of respect for black conservatism is brewing in this country, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. would be proud of it.

With all of this progress, why is it that we continue to hear charges of racism emanating from the left, and most disturbingly, from the White House itself? It seems anytime there is criticism of the President or any of his black members of his administration, such as Attorney General Eric Holder, that criticism is decried as racist.

Mr. Holder recently said of his critics, “This is a way to get at the president because of the way I can be identified with him, both due to the nature of our relationship and, you know, the fact that we’re both African-American.” In other words, he insinuated Republicans — along with Conservatives and Tea Party members — are incapable of judging anyone solely by their character, something I take very personally.

Mr. Holder and others need to know, the criticism of the President is not of his person, but of his policies, which have clearly failed our nation–and most tragically of all in this supposedly post-racial period –have failed the black community.

As of December 2011, black unemployment remained in double digits, nearly double the national average for men at 16.4 percent, and 14.1 percent for women.

According to a Washington Post poll in September 2011, the proportion of black Americans with a “strongly positive” view of President Obama has slipped from 83 percent to 58 percent. It would obviously be absurd to say the black community’s changing view of President Obama is racially biased, so how can one make the same claim about white members opposing his policies?

As we proceed into this general election cycle, it would be a disgrace if Mr. Holder’s comment is the first salvo in the upcoming campaign to deflect honest assessment of the President’s performance in office. This campaign must be about ideas, policy and the direction of this country, and the President must not hide behind a curtain of so-called racial bias.

All Americans, black or white – and every shade in between – must be allowed to voice their opinions, level their criticisms and engage in candid discussion without fear of being labeled “racist” simply because of the color of their skin. This is precisely what Dr. Martin Luther King spoke of so eloquently, and what we celebrate today.

My message to President Obama is this: “Mr. President, your very presence in office demonstrates Dr. King’s dream has indeed come true. But how devastated would Dr. King be to know the Americans who are still fomenting racism at the highest levels are the very people for whom he fought for and died?”

Congressman Allen West Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Event

Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration
Monday, January 16th
8:30 am to 11:00 am
200 Ruby Street
Boca Raton, Fl

Rep Allen West Video – speaks of Faith, Founding Fathers and Tim Tebow 1/11/12

Uploaded by on Jan 11, 2012

The King’s Academy, a leader of private Christian schools in Palm Beach county, Florida, invites world-class speakers to speak to its students. This video shows U.S. Representative Allen West (R-FL) who spoke at the School on January 10, 2012. More information about The King’s Academy is available at http://www.TKA.net.

Copyright, Congressman Allen West and The King’s Academy, Inc., 2012. All rights reserved.