Allen West “In the end, progressive socialism, secular humanism, and Islamic totalitarianism will be tossed upon the ash heap”

Islam

Written by Allen West on October 19, 2013

I recently visited the Five Star Veterans Center in Jacksonville, Florida on behalf of the Allen West Foundation where we had a nice gathering of Americans and the theme of “The American Dream.”

As I drove home after the event heading to South Florida, ‘round about Cocoa Beach I gazed over in amazement at a disturbing electronic billboard sign. I thought perhaps my eyes were just tired. However, as we got further down the road near Vero Beach, I saw the sign again: “Find Jesus in the Quran” with some quranic verse number and the website, whyislam.org.

Hours before, I had spoken about the American dream and Jefferson’s immortal words, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights.” Those words embody the American Dream: that our individual rights emanate from God, our Creator, not from man or government. It is that deep Judeo-Christian faith that enabled 56 men to embark upon the quest of creating a nation where the individual reigned preeminent.

So how was it that I gazed upon two electronic billboards promoting an ideology that translates into the word, “surrender?”

Read more at http://allenbwest.com/2013/10/slow-assault-faith-heritage/#hhuUhr2VXFMPgMef.99

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SPECIAL EDITION: Allen West Weekly Update 8/28/13 via @Next_GenTV

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In Pursuit Of Martin Luther King’s Dream
He imagined opportunity, but we’re creating dependency

 

Today marks the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech. He delivered it five score years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, hence the decision to give it in Lincoln’s shadow at his memorial site in Washington, D.C.

Now we are two score and 10 years from the date of Dr. King’s monumental speech to ensure that the self-evident truth defined by Thomas Jefferson and echoed by Lincoln – “that all men are created equal” – lives up to its meaning. It is quite appropriate that the monuments to these three astute Americans are within eyeshot of each other.

However, where have we come in these 50 years and what should we celebrate on this anniversary? Have we achieved the dream Dr. King hoped we would? I say we are not there yet, and in some ways we have gone backward.

Blacks are chained in economic bondage

A half-century ago, Dr. King said: “The Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.”

Today there can be no doubt that we have highly successful blacks in all walks of life, but when we examine the state of America’s inner cities, we must all be appalled. Shall I say Detroit?

We have fought to break the chains of physical bondage, but the chains of economic bondage are even worse. This is not about social justice, but it is about ensuring that the economic opportunities of America can resurrect small-business entrepreneurship in the black community.

Our economic, tax and regulatory policies must promote free-market growth, innovation, ingenuity and investment. Instead, our policies are expanding the dependency society, not the opportunity society.

We need to promote the growth of small community banks to provide the capital for entrepreneurs in inner cities who have ideas in their heads and determination in their hearts. The Reagan administration pushed this philosophy via urban economic empowerment zones.

Dr. King also stated that “America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked insufficient funds.” Today, the government is issuing welfare by way of electronic benefits transfer cards and even recruiting people to enroll in the program. The government is issuing free cell phones.

This is not the dream Dr. King wanted us to live. As a matter of fact, Booker T. Washington built a three-pronged attack plan for the black community – education, entrepreneurship and self-reliance. That was Dr. King’s dream.

The travesties of black crime and abortion

If we had economic opportunities and better education – and remember, President Obama cancelled the latter when he killed the District of Columbia’s school voucher program – maybe we would not have the record high unemployment in the black community. The problem is especially acute among black teenagers, who it seems are so bored that they hunt down and kill innocent people.

Not far from Dr. King’s birthplace in Atlanta, a young black teenager sits accused of shooting a 13-month-old baby in the face. That is not part of the dream.

We also are witnessing the complete breakdown and collapse of the family, which was the foundational strength of the black community. Today, 72 percent of black children are born out of wedlock. That is not part of the dream.

Dr. King talked about the promissory note of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence and the guarantee of unalienable rights – life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. However, when it comes to life, over the past two score years, mothers have aborted some 13 million black babies. The black community would be 36 percent greater save for this tragedy, this genocide.

How many babies never got the chance to pursue Dr. King’s dream – the American dream? How many will never get to be among the next generation of doctors, lawyers, successful businessmen and women, prominent entertainers and sports figures. This travesty is certainly not part of Dr. King’s dream.

So where are the voices speaking up about these issues?

Booker T. Washington stated in 1911:

There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs – partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays.

Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances because they do not want to lose their jobs.

Living the dream and fighting to win it for others
My challenge is simple: Shall we just hear the same ole rhetorical speeches on the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s “dream” speech, or shall we sincerely assess where we have come since Aug. 28, 1963?

In 1961 when I was born in Atlanta, in the same neighborhood as Dr. King, my parents could not go to Fort Lauderdale Beach or Palm Beach Island in Florida. Fifty years, later I was sworn in to Congress to represent Florida’s 22d District, which included the coastline from Fort Lauderdale to Jupiter, including Palm Beach.

I was the first black Republican member of Congress from Florida since Josiah T. Walls in 1874. The election was not about the color of my skin; it was about the content of my character. How paradoxical, then, that John Lewis, who spoke on the famed day of Dr. King’s speech in 1963 and went on to serve in Congress (actually as my representative in Atlanta), campaigned against me in 2010.

I still have a dream, one deeply rooted in the American dream – for my two daughters, for the black community, for all Americans and those who seek liberty and freedom. My dream is not based upon servitude to the government but rather upon exceptionalism.

I have been to California, Colorado and New Hampshire. I was educated in Tennessee and born and raised in Georgia. I am promoting and living Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream by example – a dream that I was reminded of every time as a young boy walking past Ebenezer Baptist Church on Auburn Ave.

Now the next generation is depending on us to fulfill Dr. King’s dream and ensure the promise of the American dream for them.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West

Allen West “This nation elected a black president, not once but twice. Have we come far since the abolition of slavery, and Dr. King’s march 50 years ago?”

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by Allen West via Facebook

In 1961 when I was born in Atlanta in Dr King’s neighborhood, my parents would not have been allowed on Ft. Lauderdale beach or Palm Beach Island. Fifty years later, I was sworn in as the Congressional Representative of those same beaches. This nation elected a black president, not once but twice. Have we come far since the abolition of slavery, and Dr. King‘s march 50 years ago? Absolutely, but when we examine the state of America’s inner cities, we must all be appalled. Dr. King talked about the Declaration of Independence and the guarantee of unalienable rights of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. But when it comes to life, over the past two score years, some 13 million black babies have been aborted. The black community would be 36% greater if not for this tragedy, this genocide. How many babies never got the chance to experience King’s dream, the American dream? And why are there so few voices speaking up on these issues? In the last 50 years we have witnessed the complete breakdown and collapse of what once was the foundational strength of the black community, the family. We fought to break the chains of physical bondage, but today the chains of economic and social bondage are even greater.

MLK

Allen West Joins PJ Media’s Next Generation TV as Director of Programming

Hello,

First, I want to thank you for your continuing support. I enjoyed my time serving as a member of the 112th Congress. However, those who think losing a congressional race defines me and ends my service to my country fail to realize what drives my patriotism and passion for America.

NGTV

I know many of you have been wondering what I would do next. Today, I’m excited to announce that I have joined PJ Media, LLC as their Director of Next Generation Programming. I will lead the effort to develop new programming that examines the issues of the day through the lens of the next generation, while at the same time encouraging all Americans to stand up for our nation’s collective future. As part of our new venture, I will write a free, weekly newsletter. You can check out the first edition of my newsletter below, and please sign up for it to stay informed on our work to preserve the American dream for future generations.

My parents kept the promise of America alive for me. Now it’s time for me to keep the promise of a better life alive for my children’s generation and their children’s generation. I hope you will join me in standing up for America’s future.

Visit www.NextGeneration.TV today to learn more, and be sure to sign up for my free, weekly newsletter.

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West

NGTV Weekly Update

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Standing Up For Our Future

Greetings to all Americans, and welcome to the Next Generation weekly update.

I am so thrilled that PJ Media offered me the opportunity to lead their new, mission-critical programming that zeros in on the future for America’s next generation. Using many forms of media such as Internet TV, social media, live events, outreach programs and newsletters like this one, we will examine the challenges facing our nation through the eyes of young Americans while encouraging all Americans to stand up for our nation’s future. All of the new programming we are developing will be rolling out in February and March on NextGeneration.TV. And I’ll keep you up to date on our work to preserve the American dream for future generations right here in this newsletter every week.

You may be wondering why am I taking on this mission.

Earlier this month, my family and I traveled to Phoenix, Ariz., to attend the 2013 BCS Fiesta Bowl. It was truly great to be in such a festive atmosphere, and even see some old friends.

However, as I watched the opening kickoff, I got that deep feeling in the pit of my stomach that it would be a long evening for the K-State Wildcat Nation. So my mind started to drift and analyze what was before me.

I looked over at my two daughters, dressed in K-State purple, and thought about my first college bowl game. I considered the cost today to attend a BCS bowl game, and thought about how the college-bowl experience will be something that will be harder for future generations to afford.

Is our dollar losing such value that ticket prices may become untenable for our next generation? I remember as a kid working hard doing errands and chores for neighbors, like washing cars and cutting grass, to earn the money to go see a game.

This is just one example of traditional American experiences we must stand up for in order to preserve the American dream for future generations.

We find ourselves dealing with incredibly pressing concerns about our fiscal security. We are on track for our fifth year of a deficit larger than $1 Trillion, and no one seems to want to tackle the issue of federal government spending, which is currently near 25 percent of our gross domestic product (GDP).

Instead, hardworking Americans, like those who want to take their kids to ball games, saw a two percent decrease in their take-home pay, and are faced with eight new taxes associated with the Affordable Care Act.

We are embroiled in a seminal decision about American individual liberty and freedom. I am making a stand because I want Americans to have greater opportunities, and that should be our promise to the Next Generation. Will you join me?

Steadfast and Loyal,

Allen B. West

Next Generation Today 
hosted by Allen West
Launches Monday, February, 4, 2013.
Check back often for special previews and discussions.